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Musica classica italiana del XX e XXI secolo

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4 ore fa, Majaniello dice:

 

ho organizzato una serata-incubo in cui ho dato Todo Modo

 

Dai! Sto leggendo il libro. Geniale:ok:

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On 26/7/2020 at 18:51, Majaniello dice:

 

Per il compleanno mi hanno regalato un proiettore, sicchè nelle vesti di un novello Guidobaldo Maria Riccardelli ho organizzato una serata-incubo in cui ho dato Todo Modo (una scelta sadicamente majaniellica). Nel film il maestro ci ridà dentro con l'organazzo, anche se a me questo cromatismo claustrofobico e senza via d'uscita ha ricordato più Reger che Messiaen (pare che Petri avesse il compositore francese in mente).

 

Non conosco il film, interessante, infatti sembra più un simil Reger. Io recentemente ho rivisto questo:

Anche qui musiche "folli" di Morricone, in gran parte notevoli e molto sperimentali.

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L'immagine può contenere: 1 persona, persona seduta e spazio al chiuso

Volevo segnalarvi questa curiosa fotografia scattata durante l'ultima guerra mondiale: Alfredo Casella e la principessa Maria Josè del Belgio suonano un pezzo per pianoforte a quattro mani per i soldati feriti, in un ospedale di Roma.

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Lachenmann parla di Morricone in un'intervista di qualche anno fa:

YOU TRY AND AVOID THE CATEGORIES OF SERIOUS VERSUS ENTERTAINMENT MUSIC. INSTEAD, YOU TALK ABOUT MAGIC AND ART. BUT WHERE WOULD YOU PUT MORRICONE’S MUSIC ON THE SPECTRUM, IF YOU HAD TO?

Well, to be able to answer that quickly, I’ll turn to an observation I once made to [the late German music theorist] Heinz-Klaus Metzger. He was having a fit about the dishonest way Schlager music promises happiness. And I told him: “Entertainment lies, but it lies honestly. The so-called ‘serious’ composers, like us, keep trying to deceive ourselves.” That’s much worse. But Morricone’s deceit is brilliant. His work is haunted by so much expertise in the tradition, which then gets kind of heated up from the inside. And all of that is a part of the arrangements he makes, which, to me, are as interesting for their technical mastery as they are for the power of their melodic invention.

SO YOU’RE AN ADVOCATE FOR MELODY?

Why not? When I used to take my kids on vacation, it’s not like we were singing atonal songs in the car. But there’s something else about it that I don’t find anywhere else: Morricone’s music takes its sweet time. And each one of his film scores is different, which is radically different from most film composers, who are like music delivery boys. I got to know his music in 1961. “Once Upon a Time in the West” had just come out here. And I thought: who is that composer? He must have such a mastery of practical music theory. Now I know that he was a student of Goffredo Petrassi’s. And that he came to Darmstadt, in 1958.

AND IS IT ART?

Not as emphatically as, say, Ligeti’s “Apparitions,” or the movement “Träumerei” from Schumann’s “Kinderszenen.” But it’s art in the sense that it’s a combination of absolute mastery of craft, coupled with a deep originality. Morricone didn’t invent a new musical language. He’s also not a Structuralist or anything. But within the bounds of the old categories—melody, harmony, and rhythm—he found a way to charge them with an energy that I haven’t come across in any other music. For me, he’s a successor to Dimitri Tiomkin, Nino Rota, and Bernard Herrmann. He managed to discover new things in places where I thought everything had already been done to death—and for a long time already. There’s that famous basso ostinato in Pachelbel, and Morricone references it at the organ entrance in “Sacco and Vanzetti”…

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3 ore fa, Majaniello dice:

Lachenmann parla di Morricone in un'intervista di qualche anno fa:

YOU TRY AND AVOID THE CATEGORIES OF SERIOUS VERSUS ENTERTAINMENT MUSIC. INSTEAD, YOU TALK ABOUT MAGIC AND ART. BUT WHERE WOULD YOU PUT MORRICONE’S MUSIC ON THE SPECTRUM, IF YOU HAD TO?

Well, to be able to answer that quickly, I’ll turn to an observation I once made to [the late German music theorist] Heinz-Klaus Metzger. He was having a fit about the dishonest way Schlager music promises happiness. And I told him: “Entertainment lies, but it lies honestly. The so-called ‘serious’ composers, like us, keep trying to deceive ourselves.” That’s much worse. But Morricone’s deceit is brilliant. His work is haunted by so much expertise in the tradition, which then gets kind of heated up from the inside. And all of that is a part of the arrangements he makes, which, to me, are as interesting for their technical mastery as they are for the power of their melodic invention.

SO YOU’RE AN ADVOCATE FOR MELODY?

Why not? When I used to take my kids on vacation, it’s not like we were singing atonal songs in the car. But there’s something else about it that I don’t find anywhere else: Morricone’s music takes its sweet time. And each one of his film scores is different, which is radically different from most film composers, who are like music delivery boys. I got to know his music in 1961. “Once Upon a Time in the West” had just come out here. And I thought: who is that composer? He must have such a mastery of practical music theory. Now I know that he was a student of Goffredo Petrassi’s. And that he came to Darmstadt, in 1958.

AND IS IT ART?

Not as emphatically as, say, Ligeti’s “Apparitions,” or the movement “Träumerei” from Schumann’s “Kinderszenen.” But it’s art in the sense that it’s a combination of absolute mastery of craft, coupled with a deep originality. Morricone didn’t invent a new musical language. He’s also not a Structuralist or anything. But within the bounds of the old categories—melody, harmony, and rhythm—he found a way to charge them with an energy that I haven’t come across in any other music. For me, he’s a successor to Dimitri Tiomkin, Nino Rota, and Bernard Herrmann. He managed to discover new things in places where I thought everything had already been done to death—and for a long time already. There’s that famous basso ostinato in Pachelbel, and Morricone references it at the organ entrance in “Sacco and Vanzetti”…

Fa tenerezza Lachemann, per il modo in cui cerca di dire che scrive musica del tutto inutile rispetto a quella di Morricone! :cat_lol:

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